Blog

Viewing 33 - 48 out of 52 posts

Equine Skin Conditions: Part 1

For large animals, horses tend to be very sensitive and also tend to have unique veterinary problems.  Their skin is no different.  Horses have a relatively “thin” skin and can Read More

Equine Navicular Disease/Chronic Heel Pain: A Common But Misunderstood Problem

The loss of use resulting from chronic lameness (pain in a limb that causes visible change in gait) costs the equine industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually.  Foot lameness Read More

Equine Laminitis: Part 2: Treatment & Prevention

In Part 1 of this article, I explained what laminitis is and described some current ideas on how it is caused.  I discussed the anatomy of the attachments of the Read More

Equine Laminitis: Part 1: What is it?

Laminitis (a/k/a “founder”) is a disease of the feet common in equines – horses, donkeys, and mules.  This disease is one of the most heartbreaking and costly to the equine Read More

Equine Infectious Diseases & Prevention

Maximizing your own knowledge of horse health enables you to make intelligent decisions that save you money while providing the best care for your horses. Understanding the fundamentals of equine Read More

Equine Gastric Ulcers: What Horse Owners Should Know

In the past 10-15 years, it has become clear how common gastric (stomach) ulcers are in trained horses and in the general horse population. This problem has a huge impact Read More

Equine Dentistry: Part 2 – Performance

There are many different opinions on how effective dental treatments are on equine performance.  There is still much research to be done.  However, recent observation and research may be cause Read More

Equine Dentistry: Part 1 – The Basics

In the last two decades there has been a revolution in equine dentistry.  Twenty years ago, very little effort was made to care for horse’s teeth.  Basic dental “floating” has Read More

Equine Colic (Abdominal Pain): Part 2

In Part 1 of this article, I discussed how colic is not a disease but a group of signs shown by a horse experiencing abdominal pain. The signs can range Read More

Equine Colic (Abdominal Pain): Part 1

It always surprises me when an experienced horse person asks me how I treat “colic.” That question is akin to asking a physician how they treat a “limp.” Equine colic Read More

Deciding When to Use “Risk-Based” Vaccines

Vaccination is one of the most practical and cost-effective means for reducing infectious disease incidence in horses. There are dozens of equine vaccines made by various pharmaceutical companies and for Read More

Cushing’s Disease / Syndrome – PPID & EMS: What Horse Owners Should Know

Horse owners are often unaware of problems that affect their horse’s health in less obvious ways.  Endocrine diseases are classic examples.  The endocrine system is the hormonal, regulatory system of Read More

Common Veterinary Tests Used to Diagnose Conditions Causing Colic (CCC’s)

Your horse is showing signs of colic. You have asked us to provide emergency veterinary care, or your local veterinarian has referred you to us for additional diagnostic testing and Read More

Colitis, Diarrhea & Intestinal Health in Adult Horses

The equine digestive tract is a complex and fragile system that is easily disrupted.  The intestines (about 80 feet long in an average adult horse) digest and absorb feed, extract Read More

Colic Surgery: What Horse Owners Should Know (Revised 2014)

Tonight you must make a quick decision about your very best horse – proceed with emergency colic surgery or put him down (euthanasia). What do you do? Imagine that tonight, at Read More

Care & Management of the Growing Foal (One Week through Weanling): Part 2

In Part 1 of this article, I discussed management and veterinary considerations for the baby foal from birath through one week of age. In this article I continue with some Read More

Viewing 33 - 48 out of 52 posts

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